Knowledge Base » Submitting to Publishers & Agents » Getting Published Traditionally

 

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Understanding Copyright and Fair Use

 

COPYRIGHT

 

Did you know that you have invoked a copyright as soon as you write something—putting it on paper or other media? For many years I didn’t understand this concept. I thought I needed to take out a copyright on each short story, article, or book I wrote.

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Plan Your Career as You Would a Synopsis

Do you hate to write synopses? I do. After 34 books, you’d think that I could get it right, but writing synopses still gives me the heebie-jeebies. Maybe that’s why I also struggle in trying to plan a writing career. (A career plan—what’s that?)

Writing a synopsis and planning a

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The Writing Conference Success Guide

You have the opportunity to attend a writers’ conference. You’re more than excited; you’re also a bit nervous. What can you do to make the most of it? What can you do to prepare for it?

After attending many conferences, I’ve come up with what I call my “conference success

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To Build a Career, Give ‘Em What They Want

Nordstroms is a department store with a well-deserved reputation for providing not only quality goods but also quality service. Customer loyalty to the store is legendary. Associates are schooled in “the care and feeding” of customers.

 

Okay. You get it. Nordstroms is a great store. (And no, I’m not

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Glossary of Common Publishing Terms

What’s your writing IQ? Do you know the lingo used in the writing and publishing business? Take a look at the following definitions and see how many you know.

Let’s start at the beginning with basic terms:

 

Antagonist: the anti-hero or force who works to keep the protagonist from

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The Writer as Businessperson: How to Take Your Career Seriously

My husband owns a business that makes power supplies. He operates it as would any business person, with attention to inventory, marketing, record-keeping and, always, professionalism.

Did you know that writers are also business people? Sometimes, however, we forget that, focusing on the creative side and neglecting the business one.

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6 Steps to Fewer Rejection Letters

Most writers have weathered rejections.  I know I have.  For every acceptance I receive, I can count five to ten rejections.  I’ve learned to live with this. (Mostly.)  However, there are ways of minimizing rejections.

“I can’t control whether an editor likes my story,” an inexperienced writer may object.

Not

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Video Quickie: Want to Know Where Publishing is Heading? Listen Up….

 

 

MEMBERS ONLY: 

View Julie Hedlund's vital video Don’t Fear the Future: Embrace It!
for some real inside scoop about the future of publishing!

http://cbiclubhouse.com/clubhouse/dont-fear-the-future-embrace-it/

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Take Chances To Get Published

slots

 

In an editorial several years ago, I described a tree house in the backyard of a local restaurant. I wrote, “The entire structure has been pieced together from recycled lumber, much of which still bears the paint, logos or posters of the original walls from whence it came. The generous

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How a Bestselling Children’s Book Series Was Created

Natasha Wings's Night Before…. series regularly tops the Picture Book charts. In this exclusive video, Natasha shares how she came up with the idea!

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Natasha Wing has been writing children's books for 20 years and has published 22 books with more on the way. She

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Create a Query that Gets a “Yes”

We have taken classes on how to write the perfect query letter. We know the ins and outs of crafting that attention-grabbing letter that will snare an editor and/or agent’s question. Or do we?

 

Do you know how to keep your query letter from being filed in the circular

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How to Write a Plot Synopsis

There is no way around it— if you plan to submit your manuscript to publishers, you're going to have to write a plot synopsis. But many authors, even those who write long novels, cringe at the thought of summing up their plots in a few sentences. Here are some tips

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How to Decode a Rejection Letter

You know you’re a writer when you get your first rejection letter. It’s an inevitable part of the process. And it stinks. After you yell, or cry, or curse out the editor who clearly doesn’t know a good thing when he sees it, it’s time to decipher exactly what that rejection letter means.

Video: The Insider’s Method of Finding a Literary Agent

Agents are some of publishing’s true heroes.  They’re also among the hardest-working folks we know.  In their honor, we’ve prepared a video that will help make their lives easier — and your career more successful.

We’ve got a little-known technique for finding  literary agents who are accepting new clients, along

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Taming the Synopsis

by Jane Choate

 

 

Editor’s note: This article explains how to write a longer synopsis for a novel that would accompany the query letter. This synopsis would be up to two pages long, typed single-spaced.

 

If I ever started a business of writing bumper stickers, my first slogan would be “I Hate Synopses.”

 

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How to Write a Great Query Letter

In an ideal world, you’d be able to pitch your manuscript to an editor over a leisurely cup of coffee. But we’re forced to inhabit the real world, where you’ve got about 10 seconds to hook an editor before she decides to continue reading or reach for her form rejection

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Assembling the Perfect Submissions Packet

You’re now at an exciting time in the submissions process. You've polished your manuscript, researched appropriate publishers and studied their submission guidelines. Now you're finally going to send your manuscript out into the world to be read by editors.

Publishers will specify on their guidelines exactly

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How To Analyze a Publisher’s Catalog

Before submitting your work, it’s essential that you study publishers’ lists to find the best fit for your manuscript. Your first stop is Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market published by Writer’s Digest Books. Note which publishers do the type of book you’ve written, and are also accepting submissions from new

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Formatting Poetry for Submission

If you’re submitting a rhyming text to a book publisher, you’re going to format a bit differently than prose formatting.  For books written in verse, using a full double-space between lines might make the text too loose and hard to read. Instead, use 1.5 spaces within the verses, and double

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Get Ready to Submit!

You’ve written your manuscript, received feedback from knowledgeable  sources, and incorporated any revisions you agreed were necessary. Now you’ll tick off those final items on your to-do list before dropping your manuscript in the mail.

 


Polish with a Final Edit

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Step-by-Step: Writing a Perfect Query Letter

You've got 10 seconds to hook an editor.  Here's how to do it:

In a perfect world, you'd be able to pitch your manuscript to an editor over a leisurely cup of coffee. But we're forced to inhabit the real world, where you've got about 10 seconds to hook an