Knowledge Base » Creating Characters » Plotting & Pacing » Uncategorized

 

9

Perfect Your Pacing

 

As you’re building your plot or moving bits of information around in a nonfiction book, here are some tips to keep your readers glued to the page.

 

Use Pacing to Your Advantage

 

Books that have a very even tone start to finish tend to lull the reader

2

Using Public Domain Stories

Kids often ask me how I was able to “copy” The Night Before Christmas and not get in trouble.

“It’s in the public domain,” I say, “so I don’t need permission.”

What does public domain mean? Material – such as stories, songs and movies – that is unprotected by intellectual

0

Do You Have to Write From Beginning to End?

Many writers believe they have to begin with “Once upon a time” and finish with “The End.” In between, every word must be written exactly in the order that it will be read. There is little flexibility in this approach – and it’s difficult to continue the entire way through

0

Understanding Cause & Effect

When we write fiction, we see the story in our mind long before it’s down on paper. We know why our characters are acting the way they do because we are familiar with their past and in control of their future. We understand the significance of every event in the

4

Plot Guidelines for Writing in Different Fiction Genres

From mysteries to thrillers to historical fiction – learn the rules of the road for developing your plot.

 

Genre writing requires particular attention to plot, as each genre has its own unique plot structure. When creating your characters and determining your story’s catalyst, keep in mind where the overall

1

Endings That Deliver

Have you ever gotten to the end of a book and thought “So what?” Did it make you want to read more by that author, or recommend the book to a friend? Satisfying endings go hand in hand with strong beginnings in framing the reader’s experience. No matter how masterfully written the rest of the story, if the ending is a letdown it overshadows everything that came before.

1

How to Develop a Sub-Plot

 

If you’re writing a book that’s longer than an easy reader or early chapter book, you’re going to need sub-plots. Sub-plots give heft to longer fiction and allow you to introduce more characters and other aspects of your protagonist’s life. Well-crafted sub-plots are related to the main action plot

4

Video: Laura on The Difference Between Plot & Theme

5

Video: Does My Story Need a Plot?

6

Open with a Bang! Crafting Great Beginnings

You've Got 10 Seconds to Grab an Editor's Attention.  Here's How…

begin1When an editor opens up the envelope containing your manuscript and begins to read, you have 10 seconds to get her attention. If she’s not captivated by the end of the first page (or maybe the second page if