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6 Steps to Fewer Rejection Letters

Most writers have weathered rejections.  I know I have.  For every acceptance I receive, I can count five to ten rejections.  I’ve learned to live with this. (Mostly.)  However, there are ways of minimizing rejections.

“I can’t control whether an editor likes my story,” an inexperienced writer may object.

Not

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Take Chances To Get Published

slots

 

In an editorial several years ago, I described a tree house in the backyard of a local restaurant. I wrote, “The entire structure has been pieced together from recycled lumber, much of which still bears the paint, logos or posters of the original walls from whence it came. The generous

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How to Write a Plot Synopsis

There is no way around it— if you plan to submit your manuscript to publishers, you're going to have to write a plot synopsis. But many authors, even those who write long novels, cringe at the thought of summing up their plots in a few sentences. Here are some tips

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How to Decode a Rejection Letter

You know you’re a writer when you get your first rejection letter. It’s an inevitable part of the process. And it stinks. After you yell, or cry, or curse out the editor who clearly doesn’t know a good thing when he sees it, it’s time to decipher exactly what that rejection letter means.

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Taming the Synopsis

by Jane Choate

 

 

Editor’s note: This article explains how to write a longer synopsis for a novel that would accompany the query letter. This synopsis would be up to two pages long, typed single-spaced.

 

If I ever started a business of writing bumper stickers, my first slogan would be “I Hate Synopses.”

 

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How to Write a Great Query Letter

In an ideal world, you’d be able to pitch your manuscript to an editor over a leisurely cup of coffee. But we’re forced to inhabit the real world, where you’ve got about 10 seconds to hook an editor before she decides to continue reading or reach for her form rejection

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Assembling the Perfect Submissions Packet

You’re now at an exciting time in the submissions process. You've polished your manuscript, researched appropriate publishers and studied their submission guidelines. Now you're finally going to send your manuscript out into the world to be read by editors.

Publishers will specify on their guidelines exactly

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How To Analyze a Publisher’s Catalog

Before submitting your work, it’s essential that you study publishers’ lists to find the best fit for your manuscript. Your first stop is Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market published by Writer’s Digest Books. Note which publishers do the type of book you’ve written, and are also accepting submissions from new

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Get Ready to Submit!

You’ve written your manuscript, received feedback from knowledgeable  sources, and incorporated any revisions you agreed were necessary. Now you’ll tick off those final items on your to-do list before dropping your manuscript in the mail.

 


Polish with a Final Edit

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Step-by-Step: Writing a Perfect Query Letter

You've got 10 seconds to hook an editor.  Here's how to do it:

In a perfect world, you'd be able to pitch your manuscript to an editor over a leisurely cup of coffee. But we're forced to inhabit the real world, where you've got about 10 seconds to hook an